Hello, Old Pal Anxiety!

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Ingrid has colitis and other health challenges; the unpredictability of her physical issues gives her anxiety. Margaret has a fear of flying which has gotten progressively worse; due to her anxiety she has not stepped foot on a plane in years. Peter is a widower and single dad with three daughters; the oldest one has anorexia and he is experiencing great anxiety regarding her well-being, as well as her sister’s. The two teenagers are both plagued by anxiety as well.

Anxiety is a more and more prevailing challenge for many people. One in five Canadians has a mild to severe mood or anxiety disorder. Anxiety is especially on the rise among children and teens. It is a continuously growing concern at any age. What is happening in our brains and how can we address this issue?

To understand how our brains function, we need to remember that for our ancestors, negative experiences had more impact for their survival than positive ones. They needed to remember their painful or dangerous experiences so they would not repeat them, in order to survive. Our brain is still wired that way. Our brains evolved with a “negativity bias” (Rick Hansen). In general, we remember negative experiences more easily, unless we really focus on the positive ones and take them in deeply. That is like a “learning disability” and traps us in conflict. So, it does not help at all to tell somebody who is worrying or has anxiety to think positively.

Anxiety - time

The experience of uncertainty which creates anxiety comes from the fact that we can make representations of time. We structure our experiences into past, present and future. The ability to analyze the past and think ahead to the future is part of the human survival kit. We are supposed to learn from the past, be very awake and alert in the present and make sure we are safe in the future. Unfortunately, our ability to evaluate future risks is only based on a few facts and our left brain fills the gaps between those facts in with a story. Depending on which subconscious beliefs we have about ourselves and the world, this story our left brain makes up is either a supportive one or a limiting and fear-inducing one. In the case of anxiety, our left brain has created a fear narrative.

Mark Twain says it humorously:Anxiety - Mark Twain

Most thoughts that makes us anxious are thoughts about the future, a future that generally never happens like we imagine. That is why mindfulness and staying in the present moment helps to train the brain to stay focused on the here and now. The present is all that is real. Therefore, mindfulness alone can already help with anxiety.

We have also been trained to avoid unpleasant emotions, to push them down and not feel them. So naturally, we don’t want to feel anxiety. However, our attempt to push unpleasant feelings down, keeps the anxiety going. The attempt to make anxiety go away is what traps us in it, not the anxiety itself. Instead of putting all our energy towards avoiding the anxiety and trying to get rid of it, we can learn to be with it and ride it out.

It is an ancient Buddhist practice to stay with the feeling that arises. So when fear or dread arises, we can welcome it into our heart and stay with it until it has moved through us. Greet the anxiety like an old friend, “Hello, my friend. I know you. You are my old pal fear. Welcome back.” Then keep breathing all the way into your belly, long deep and complete breaths, letting your belly expand on the inhale, and become smaller on the exhale. Simply being with the fear allows it to come and go like all other mental content.

meditation-monk

Of course, mindfulness and being with the feeling requires practice, like everything else in life. When we say, “I have tried that mindfulness thing, it doesn’t work” it’s like saying “I have tried playing the piano, it does not work”.

Often we believe uncertainty is the problem to be solved. “If I could just control my physical body”, or “If I could just have the guarantee that there will be no turbulence”, or “If I just knew whether I will pass my exam or not”, or “If I just knew that my child will be alright in the future”.

Uncertainty is not a problem to solve. A much more useful approach is to rest in the uncertainty and experience it as a sanctuary of possibilities. When we are emotionally in a place to create a positive influence or make choices, we end up being more comfortable with the uncertainty of a situation and, in the end, are more in control.

A situation of suffering and uncertainty can challenge our whole identity. Being sick might challenge my identity to be a productive and capable human. A fear or phobia might challenge my identity as a rational adult or spiritual person. A crisis with my child might challenge my identity as a good parent.

We first of all need to remember that we still are who we always were. In fact, we are everything. We are capable and rational and spiritual and a good parent. We are just having the experience of a hugely challenging situation. Because it is unpleasant to feel the pain, disappointment, shame, anger, fear or other emotion, we seek control. If we instead acknowledge the painful feelings, we can shift into a place of self-compassion. We can then move from attempting to gain control to choice.

We can always ask “What can I choose? What can I bring to this situation? Courage? Trust? Love? Who do I want to be in this situation? And how do I want to feel?” The answer might be “I want to feel less alone and therefore I reach out for support to address this health crisis” or “I want to be present and calm on the airplane and trust that I am safe in the Universe” or “I want to be compassionate and loving with my struggling child”.

Anxiety - choices

 

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Angelika, Belief Change Coach

905-286-9466, greendoorrelaxation@yahoo.ca

You can also join me on this meditation to ask ourselves

what we can choose in a current anxiety provoking situation:

“I just can’t meditate!”

A couple of years ago, I used to teach a meditation class. These days, I only lead a meditation for our monthly PSYCH-K® practice group or the occasional networking meeting. Last week, I was given the opportunity to guide the meditation at one of the amazing Wild About Wellness meetings Simone Usselman-Tod organizes for health-care practitioners in Burlington, Guelph and Hamilton. Afterwards one participant said to me, “I really liked what you said about meditation because I have learned something new…”

What was it that I had said before starting the meditation? It was really quite simple and the answer to a concern I have often heard from meditation beginners. I have heard people say many times: “I just can’t quiet my mind to meditate. I don’t know what to do to shut my thoughts off!”

Meditation has nothing to do with doing. In fact, it is the exact opposite of doing! Meditation is just being in the moment. Meditation means letting go, letting go of all thoughts that go into the past or the future. It means gently bringing and keeping your attention on what is right now in this very moment in time, being present with whatever shows up.

Meditation Tia OshoDoing the dishes or pulling weeds can be a meditation, as long as you are fully present with what you are doing. Or, as my good friend Lisbeth Fregonese said in a radio interview the other day, “Maybe you are meditation walker, a meditation swimmer, or a meditation jogger.”

Walking, running, swimming, roller blading, riding your bike, dancing, singing and so on can all be meditative. All that is required is that you allow yourself to be fully immersed in whatever you are doing. Embrace mindfulness. Allow your mind, body and spirit to be in rhythm with the walking, running, or swimming. For me writing is meditative. When I allow the thoughts to flow through me and onto the screen, I am not thinking or feeling anything else.

meditation Osho 1One of the biggest distractions which prevents us from fully being present is our phone. Do we really need to be constantly available by phone, e-mail or text? What if we turned our phone off when we are having dinner with our family or when we are on an outing? What if we even turned if off for an entire Sunday to be fully present with the sunshine, to enjoy our back-yard, our loved ones, whatever we are doing? What if we gave ourselves permission to be fully present with our children, our partner, our family or friends? What if we allowed ourselves to give our full attention to whatever we are doing in each given moment, instead of constantly multitasking? What if we opened up to being mindful in each moment in time?

When we are totally here, no yesterday pulling us back with feelings of regret or resentment, no tomorrow pulling us forward and making us anxious, we feel calm, connected, and centred. When we think too much of the past or the future we are wasting the present. Yet, the present is the only thing which is real.

Meditation river Osho

Osho gives a beautiful metaphor of how to quiet your mind which I used to like to read out to my meditation class participants:

“Thoughts settle on their own accord, you need not jump amongst them, you need not try to put them right. It is as if a stream has become muddy… what do you do? Do you jump in it and start helping the stream to become clear? You will make it more muddy. You simply sit on the bank. You wait. There is nothing to be done. Because whatsoever you do will make the stream more muddy. If somebody has passed through a stream and the dead leaves have surfaced and the mud has arisen, just patience is needed. You simply sit on the bank. Watch, indifferently. And as the stream goes on flowing, the dead leaves will be taken away, and the mud will start settling because it cannot hang forever there. After a while, suddenly you will become aware – the stream is crystal-clear again.”

Another misconception people have is that—unless they have a certain amount of time—they do not need to bother meditating. It is not necessary to sit and meditate for an hour every day. Once you start meditating you might want to meditate for an hour because it feels so good but even allowing yourself to be still, relaxed and mindful for ten minutes at a time makes a big difference.

Meditation cup Osho

Angelika Baum

Relaxation, Meditation, Subconscious Belief Changes
905-286-9466

greendoorrelaxation@yahoo.ca

Angelika wide picture for blogs

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